The Long Road Back

By | March 24, 2014

The road back to health for the elderly patient is long and full of uncertainties and problems.  Having a well thought out plan and a good guide significantly increases the chances of success.

The road back to health for the elderly patient is long and full of uncertainties and problems. Having a well thought out plan and a good guide significantly increases the chances of success.

I hope that you will forgive me for taking Friday off, but I am still a doctor first and a journalist second and last week was very busy in the office, here at Schlesinger Pain Centers. In addition since we will be embarking on a new series of blogs I felt that Monday was a more propitious day. In this series of blogs I would like to consider the general problem of rehabilitation in the elderly and specifically how it differs to rehabilitation programs for the young. It is important at the outset to define the scope of the problem and discuss the interrelation of the many component parts as well as the extent of commitment required. You may ask of whom am I speaking when I use the term elderly? Clearly some people are physiologically young at 90 and others are over the hill at 30. I would posit that if you have read along this far you might well be elderly. For the sake of discussion I will describe an imaginary patient, a male of 60 years. Our crash dummy, let’s call him George, was moderately active in his youth and even rowed lightweight crew in college, but since then has done little other than an occasional game of golf or doubles tennis. He works too hard and is about 20 pounds overweight and has chronic lower back pain, which occasionally travels down his left leg to about the knee. Our patient is chronically tired and fatigued and has felt for a number of years that life is just not as enjoyable as it once was and should again be. He is ready to make some changes in his life but where to begin.


Leave Your Comment