The Long Road Back: Tendon and Ligament Repair Phase III

By | April 14, 2014

The cross linking of tropocollagen fibrils increases both shear and tensile strength.  Physical activity is a key trigger of this process.

The cross linking of tropocollagen fibrils increases both shear and tensile strength. Physical activity is a key trigger of this process.

The final period, which can last up to ten months, is characterized by the remodeling and cross-linking of the previously synthesized collagen fibrils. The trigger for this realignment and cross-linking is the stress and strain of everyday use and exercise. This realigning and cross-linking of the fibrils can restore the tendon to nearly 100% of its pre-injury strength, but only if the tendon or ligament is actively used. More interesting to us at Schlesinger Pain Centers is the remodeling that takes place even in the absence of injury. It is this remodeling that we count on to stretch out previously contracted muscles and tendons as we try to restore suppleness to a stiff back.


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