Drawbacks of Mechanical Traction

By | February 6, 2015

While not as large as Stonehenge ...

While not as large as Stonehenge …

or as complicated as a Rubik's Cube ... "Rubik's cube" by This image was created by me, Booyabazooka - Based on Image:Rubiks cube.jpg. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Rubik%27s_cube.svg#mediaviewer/File:Rubik%27s_cube.svg

or as complicated as a Rubik’s Cube …
“Rubik’s cube” by This image was created by me, Booyabazooka – Based on Image:Rubiks cube.jpg. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons – http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Rubik%27s_cube.svg#mediaviewer/File:Rubik%27s_cube.svg

traction machines are still not ideal for home use.

traction machines are still not ideal for home use.

The biggest drawback to the use of traction tables is their size, complexity and expense. Our machine here at Schlesinger Pain Centers is housed in a room of its own, requires an operator to set and start therapy and costs over $8000. As such traction tables are used almost exclusively in offices belonging to doctors and physical therapists. The one exception to this rule is simple home cervical water based traction systems, which will be dealt with in the next section. An important consequence of this factor is that therapy is episodic and intermittent, whereas the goal of all successful back rehabilitation regimes is that therapy be part of the patient’s normal daily routine. At Schlesinger Pain Centers mechanical traction is used primarily to initiate therapy and in patients who are intolerant of other distraction techniques. Clearly other forms of spinal distraction therapy need to be investigated.


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